It took me 10 years. But I did it.

 It took me 10 years. But I did it.

I turned the dingy blog I ran from my Stanford dorm room into a successful multimillion-dollar online business that's helped millions of people across the world.

Now I help thousands of people just like you start their own online business every year.

So I get asked this exact question. A LOT.

Before I go further, if you think you're going to start an online business and make a gazillion dollars in your first year with little work, skip my answer and move on. As my friend Neville wrote:

“I've met a ridiculous amount of people who've said to me, “I just want to have a business on auto-pilot where I don't have to do any work, and it spits out a lot of money.” Those people never go anywhere. I've never seen one of them succeed. They're dweebs who want SOMETHING for NOTHING. They want the world to give them something, without giving the world something back first.”

Still here? Great.

The problem is the question. We need to change it a little.

The real question you should be asking is “What is the ‘easiest’ way for ME to make money online right NOW?”

Instead of focusing on the easiest way for anyone to make money, let’s focus on the easiest way for YOU to make money.

And the easiest way for you to start making money online is by using the skills you already have.

Which means ...

Freelancing is the ‘easiest’ (and best) way you can make money online right now.

I know. It’s not as sexy as whatever the hot new online business fad of the day is (cryptocurrency trading, dropshipping, [insert other hairbrained business idea]), but it’s true.

Freelancing is great because you don’t have to:

  • Quit your dayjob to get started
  • Have a lot of cash to invest
  • Spend countless hours learning a new business or skill

AND you can do something you’re already good at AND you enjoy.

Now comes the inevitable next question, “But Ramit! How do I get started freelancing online?”

You find your (profitable) idea.

Most people have one of two problems at this point:

  1. They don’t have any business ideas or
  2. They have too many and don’t know which to choose

So here are 4 easy steps you can follow to examine your skills and find your money making idea today.

The ‘right’ money-making idea meets 4 key criteria

There are literally thousands of ‘right’ freelancing ideas out there, but here are 4 key criteria that every viable idea has to meet:

Viable idea criteria #1: It unleashes your inner X-Man

Over the years I’ve discovered that we all have a combination of knowledge, skills, and experiences. I call these X-Men abilities.

Inside each and every one of us is an X-Men ability that might be invisible to us because we do and think about these things naturally. For example, I have a friend who just LOVES clothes. If her friends ever had a fashion question, they’d ask her. What seems like nothing special to you may be extremely valuable to someone else. I can easily see her writing an ebook on women’s fashion for $50 or doing a one-on-one Skype call for $100.

YES, people do this already and have built thriving businesses around their skills! Think about the skills you have. They are tangible, countable abilities that you’ve acquired through experiences on the job, in school, or elsewhere. And listen, stop short-changing yourself. You HAVE skills. Are you really good at math? (Did you know I once hired a math tutor and paid him a lot of money?) Can you write really well? Are you really good at editing videos? Are you in shape?

There are a million skills you have, but we overlook those things about ourselves all the time. To find your skills, ask what are all the specific things you could list on your resume? Examples of skills:

• HTML

• Personal training

• Japanese

• Ad sales

• Video editing

Viable idea criteria #2: It showcases your strengths

Your money-making idea needs to showcase what you’re best at. Strengths are intangible qualities that you have a natural affinity for that make you stand out from the next person with your skillset. This is typically what college kids often cite in place of real experience and, while I like to mock it, these actually matter. For example, I know a woman who openly said she never wants to talk to customers — her strength is working behind a computer and that’s what she likes. Great! Be brutally honest. You might be really good at building systems or turning complex ideas into actionable insights.

Find your strengths: What are the qualities that have gotten you the most praise on the job or in school? Which strengths have made you feel the most ‘in the zone?’

Examples of strengths:

• Developing rapport with others quickly

• Managing multiple people and projects

• Organizing data into actionable information

• Teaching other people new ideas

Viable idea criteria #3: It’s something you like to do

Ah, the old cliche. “Do what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life.”

If you want to make money, you’ll still have to work, BUT you’ll have a lot more fun doing it and 99% of the time be a lot better at it.

Plus, people can tell when you’re genuinely passionate about something, and that passion is contagious. Would you rather hire a piano teacher who:

  1. Is bursting with excitement at the opportunity to share with you what they know about the instrument they love, or
  2. Acts like you just asked them to drop you at the airport during rush hour traffic every time you show up for your lesson

Do you think I would have spent 15 years of my life writing about finance if I didn’t find it fascinating? Hell no!

So find your interests: What do you read or research in your spare time? Magazines? Blogs? TV shows? What fascinates you most? A good example that my friend Ben (who blogs about entrepreneurship here) always mentions is, “What do you read on a Saturday morning?”

Examples of interests:

• American politics

• Live music

• Gardening

• Cycling

• Online gaming

• Street fashion

Viable idea criteria #4: People will pay you for it (who aren’t your mom)

OK, so someone may know their skills, strengths, and interests based on the above, and they might excitedly run to me, yelling, “EUREKA!!! I AM GOING TO EARN $5,000+/MONTH KNITTING COLORED BUTTONS ON FLANNEL SHIRTS ONLINE BECAUSE I AM REALLY GOOD AT KNITTING!!!” Then I slowly shed a single tear and wipe it away with my cashmere sweater.

Your idea can only be profitable if there’s an actual market for it. In other words, you have people who are willing to pay you for your service.

So how can you determine if there’s a market for your idea? Two quick tests:

1. Check for supply: Is there anyone else offering your service?

Now, a lot of people I know will actually get depressed when they notice there’s someone ‘already doing’ their idea. The competition makes them shrink away like a white guy in a spelling bee. This is the opposite of how I see it. When I see a healthy range of providers for an idea, it tells me there’s very likely a decent market for that offering. It’s good news — not something to shy away from. Since most people are terrible (see The Craigslist Penis Effect), with some ingenuity you can crush them.

2. Check for demand: Is there anyone out there looking for your service?

Have you ever seen a job posting or help wanted ad for the service you’re thinking of providing? On Craigslist, other jobs sites, or even via word of mouth? These are clear signs of demand in the marketplace for your idea, and that’s also very good news.

Every one of my students knows that they MUST validate the demand of their idea.

In other words, if you think that you can do marketing online for local restaurants, you had BETTER interview 15+ restaurant owners to see if they:

  1. Care about your idea
  2. Value it
  3. Use the same words you do to describe their problem (Check out my free post on copywriting if you need help with this)
  4. Will pay you for it

If you have no demand, you have no business — end of story.

Do your potential customers have the ABILITY and WILLINGNESS to pay?

Your market must have the ability and willingness to pay. And some people and groups are markedly bad markets. Let’s take a look at 3 examples.

  1. If your idea is to offer web services to nonprofits, you might as well give up now. That is because most non-profits can’t (they have no money) or won’t pay (because they may not see your value), even though technically it would improve their organization.
  2. If your goal is to sell some computer game service to kids, think again. While they may have the willingness to pay, they generally don’t have the ability.
  3. And the CLASSIC, CLASSIC bad idea is, “Let me sell to mom and pop shops/restaurants/businesses” and help them create a website/do marketing/etc. While local businesses have the ABILITY to pay, they don’t have a willingness to pay, mostly because small-business people are often treading water and are, in the words of a coffee-shop owner where I write, “too busy to do marketing.” Yes, it’s irrational and dumb, but it’s TRUE. Do not pursue markets where people are not willing and able to pay you.

Your 2 major takeaways are these:

  1. Your job does NOT have to be where you get your brilliant freelancing idea. Your job CAN shed light on your best skills and strengths, even if it doesn’t speak to your interests. Combining skills, strengths and interests to start generating income is NEVER a cookie-cutter formula (be wary if someone tries to tell you it is). It’s a process that requires being strategic and critical guidance.
  2. Your job skills CAN be transferred, no matter how unique you think your job is. So you’re a horse whisperer in Wyoming. Wow, unique job! Not really. You have skills in working with animals, obviously, but you also have expertise in behavioral change. There are plenty of academic labs and companies that would love to find your website and pay you for your advice and expertise.

Your first idea might not be the one that works. That’s OK! But you won’t know if you don’t try. Most of my students who make 6 or 7 figures plus from their business didn’t find their winning idea their first time around.

It’s like baseball. It doesn’t matter how many books you read about legends like Babe Ruth or YouTube videos you watch on proper hitting form. You’re not going to hit a home run until you step out onto the field and start swinging.


It took me 10 years. But I did it.

 It took me 10 years. But I did it.

I turned the dingy blog I ran from my Stanford dorm room into a successful multimillion-dollar online business that's helped millions of people across the world.

Now I help thousands of people just like you start their own online business every year.

So I get asked this exact question. A LOT.

Before I go further, if you think you're going to start an online business and make a gazillion dollars in your first year with little work, skip my answer and move on. As my friend Neville wrote:

“I've met a ridiculous amount of people who've said to me, “I just want to have a business on auto-pilot where I don't have to do any work, and it spits out a lot of money.” Those people never go anywhere. I've never seen one of them succeed. They're dweebs who want SOMETHING for NOTHING. They want the world to give them something, without giving the world something back first.”

Still here? Great.

The problem is the question. We need to change it a little.

The real question you should be asking is “What is the ‘easiest’ way for ME to make money online right NOW?”

Instead of focusing on the easiest way for anyone to make money, let’s focus on the easiest way for YOU to make money.

And the easiest way for you to start making money online is by using the skills you already have.

Which means ...

Freelancing is the ‘easiest’ (and best) way you can make money online right now.

I know. It’s not as sexy as whatever the hot new online business fad of the day is (cryptocurrency trading, dropshipping, [insert other hairbrained business idea]), but it’s true.

Freelancing is great because you don’t have to:

  • Quit your dayjob to get started
  • Have a lot of cash to invest
  • Spend countless hours learning a new business or skill

AND you can do something you’re already good at AND you enjoy.

Now comes the inevitable next question, “But Ramit! How do I get started freelancing online?”

You find your (profitable) idea.

Most people have one of two problems at this point:

  1. They don’t have any business ideas or
  2. They have too many and don’t know which to choose

So here are 4 easy steps you can follow to examine your skills and find your money making idea today.

The ‘right’ money-making idea meets 4 key criteria

There are literally thousands of ‘right’ freelancing ideas out there, but here are 4 key criteria that every viable idea has to meet:

Viable idea criteria #1: It unleashes your inner X-Man

Over the years I’ve discovered that we all have a combination of knowledge, skills, and experiences. I call these X-Men abilities.

Inside each and every one of us is an X-Men ability that might be invisible to us because we do and think about these things naturally. For example, I have a friend who just LOVES clothes. If her friends ever had a fashion question, they’d ask her. What seems like nothing special to you may be extremely valuable to someone else. I can easily see her writing an ebook on women’s fashion for $50 or doing a one-on-one Skype call for $100.

YES, people do this already and have built thriving businesses around their skills! Think about the skills you have. They are tangible, countable abilities that you’ve acquired through experiences on the job, in school, or elsewhere. And listen, stop short-changing yourself. You HAVE skills. Are you really good at math? (Did you know I once hired a math tutor and paid him a lot of money?) Can you write really well? Are you really good at editing videos? Are you in shape?

There are a million skills you have, but we overlook those things about ourselves all the time. To find your skills, ask what are all the specific things you could list on your resume? Examples of skills:

• HTML

• Personal training

• Japanese

• Ad sales

• Video editing

Viable idea criteria #2: It showcases your strengths

Your money-making idea needs to showcase what you’re best at. Strengths are intangible qualities that you have a natural affinity for that make you stand out from the next person with your skillset. This is typically what college kids often cite in place of real experience and, while I like to mock it, these actually matter. For example, I know a woman who openly said she never wants to talk to customers — her strength is working behind a computer and that’s what she likes. Great! Be brutally honest. You might be really good at building systems or turning complex ideas into actionable insights.

Find your strengths: What are the qualities that have gotten you the most praise on the job or in school? Which strengths have made you feel the most ‘in the zone?’

Examples of strengths:

• Developing rapport with others quickly

• Managing multiple people and projects

• Organizing data into actionable information

• Teaching other people new ideas

Viable idea criteria #3: It’s something you like to do

Ah, the old cliche. “Do what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life.”

If you want to make money, you’ll still have to work, BUT you’ll have a lot more fun doing it and 99% of the time be a lot better at it.

Plus, people can tell when you’re genuinely passionate about something, and that passion is contagious. Would you rather hire a piano teacher who:

  1. Is bursting with excitement at the opportunity to share with you what they know about the instrument they love, or
  2. Acts like you just asked them to drop you at the airport during rush hour traffic every time you show up for your lesson

Do you think I would have spent 15 years of my life writing about finance if I didn’t find it fascinating? Hell no!

So find your interests: What do you read or research in your spare time? Magazines? Blogs? TV shows? What fascinates you most? A good example that my friend Ben (who blogs about entrepreneurship here) always mentions is, “What do you read on a Saturday morning?”

Examples of interests:

• American politics

• Live music

• Gardening

• Cycling

• Online gaming

• Street fashion

Viable idea criteria #4: People will pay you for it (who aren’t your mom)

OK, so someone may know their skills, strengths, and interests based on the above, and they might excitedly run to me, yelling, “EUREKA!!! I AM GOING TO EARN $5,000+/MONTH KNITTING COLORED BUTTONS ON FLANNEL SHIRTS ONLINE BECAUSE I AM REALLY GOOD AT KNITTING!!!” Then I slowly shed a single tear and wipe it away with my cashmere sweater.

Your idea can only be profitable if there’s an actual market for it. In other words, you have people who are willing to pay you for your service.

So how can you determine if there’s a market for your idea? Two quick tests:

1. Check for supply: Is there anyone else offering your service?

Now, a lot of people I know will actually get depressed when they notice there’s someone ‘already doing’ their idea. The competition makes them shrink away like a white guy in a spelling bee. This is the opposite of how I see it. When I see a healthy range of providers for an idea, it tells me there’s very likely a decent market for that offering. It’s good news — not something to shy away from. Since most people are terrible (see The Craigslist Penis Effect), with some ingenuity you can crush them.

2. Check for demand: Is there anyone out there looking for your service?

Have you ever seen a job posting or help wanted ad for the service you’re thinking of providing? On Craigslist, other jobs sites, or even via word of mouth? These are clear signs of demand in the marketplace for your idea, and that’s also very good news.

Every one of my students knows that they MUST validate the demand of their idea.

In other words, if you think that you can do marketing online for local restaurants, you had BETTER interview 15+ restaurant owners to see if they:

  1. Care about your idea
  2. Value it
  3. Use the same words you do to describe their problem (Check out my free post on copywriting if you need help with this)
  4. Will pay you for it

If you have no demand, you have no business — end of story.

Do your potential customers have the ABILITY and WILLINGNESS to pay?

Your market must have the ability and willingness to pay. And some people and groups are markedly bad markets. Let’s take a look at 3 examples.

  1. If your idea is to offer web services to nonprofits, you might as well give up now. That is because most non-profits can’t (they have no money) or won’t pay (because they may not see your value), even though technically it would improve their organization.
  2. If your goal is to sell some computer game service to kids, think again. While they may have the willingness to pay, they generally don’t have the ability.
  3. And the CLASSIC, CLASSIC bad idea is, “Let me sell to mom and pop shops/restaurants/businesses” and help them create a website/do marketing/etc. While local businesses have the ABILITY to pay, they don’t have a willingness to pay, mostly because small-business people are often treading water and are, in the words of a coffee-shop owner where I write, “too busy to do marketing.” Yes, it’s irrational and dumb, but it’s TRUE. Do not pursue markets where people are not willing and able to pay you.

Your 2 major takeaways are these:

  1. Your job does NOT have to be where you get your brilliant freelancing idea. Your job CAN shed light on your best skills and strengths, even if it doesn’t speak to your interests. Combining skills, strengths and interests to start generating income is NEVER a cookie-cutter formula (be wary if someone tries to tell you it is). It’s a process that requires being strategic and critical guidance.
  2. Your job skills CAN be transferred, no matter how unique you think your job is. So you’re a horse whisperer in Wyoming. Wow, unique job! Not really. You have skills in working with animals, obviously, but you also have expertise in behavioral change. There are plenty of academic labs and companies that would love to find your website and pay you for your advice and expertise.

Your first idea might not be the one that works. That’s OK! But you won’t know if you don’t try. Most of my students who make 6 or 7 figures plus from their business didn’t find their winning idea their first time around.

It’s like baseball. It doesn’t matter how many books you read about legends like Babe Ruth or YouTube videos you watch on proper hitting form. You’re not going to hit a home run until you step out onto the field and start swinging.


Making money online can be easy, but it wouldn't last long

 Making money online can be easy, but it wouldn't last long. If you were to build a business online where you had returning customers then the money would keep coming in and not stop.

Whichever route you choose to go online to make money there will be challenges and things that make you want to quit. If it was easy there would be no one to do the lazy jobs in the world - everyone would be working online.

However making money online does get easier the longer you are learning how it done. Its like any job, you need to learn how to do it.

But when building a business online you will be your own boss and every success will be down to you!

Never forget basic rule of business … It need money to earn money..

So, you sure need investment to start business, operate it and make profit.

One of most easy and profitable option is Virtual Call center business from home.

During this pandemic, many business has to operate from home due to strict lock down , so whoever able to do it, survived … who not, had to bare huge losses.

So at start only, plan your business so if needed in future you wont need to struggle to find other option.

With basic investment of 8–10 Lakh, you can start call center business from home only.

Staff is not major concern these days, you can get very good staff as freelancers to from india and other countries. Utilize cloud solutions to monitor freelancers work with your own comfort .

If done with proper investment, management, Virtual call centers can give very good profits.

Try to read and learn more about this topic.

If need some experienced support and mentor and projects to start with, Try to connect with one of old client and mentor in this Mr. Shaik salim 7386034574 .

Good luck regards

Mrs. Rutuza Deshmukh